sports car funeral procession for Alec Ingram who died of cancer at age 14

Sports Car Funeral Procession: One Boy’s Final Wish Fulfilled

Like every other teenage boy, Alec Ingram loved sports cars. Alas, unlike that of most teenagers, Alec’s young life was cut short at 14, after the boy had battled cancer for more than four years. But more than 2,100 sports cars and 70 motorcycles gathered in a St. Louis, Missouri parking lot to fulfill the boy’s final wish for a sports car funeral procession.

Alec Ingram died on November 7. The boy had been diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, in 2015. The sports car motorcade event, dubbed “Sports Cars for Alec” was arranged by  Sydney’s Soldiers Always, an organization that does its best to fulfill the bucket lists of children suffering from terminal illness. Dana Christian Manley, who heads up the organization, had approached Alec’s family to see if Alec had something he wanted to do. Manley started the organization in memory of her daughter Sydney, whom she lost to cancer when the girl was just 8 years old.

But by the time Manley got in touch with the Ingram family, it was too late for Alec to live out any of his dreams. He was too sick to do anything much at all. Still, Alec had actually known Sydney and attended her funeral. Sydney had a funeral procession of 3,500 motorcycles. Alec thought that was cool, but thought it would be even more fabulous with sports cars, and said so. Manley remembered that idea, and decided that this was one wish, at least, that her organization could fulfill.

Manley reached out to thousands of sports and exotic car owners to make the trip to Missouri to escort Alec to his final resting place. Drivers came to Missouri from all across the country. They drove in from as far away as California, Florida, New York, Indiana, and Michigan. The streets were lined with thousands of people holding signs, there to support the Ingram family. The crowd was so large, and so many vehicles showed up that the city was forced to shut down for the more than two hours it took to complete the procession.

According to Manley, who spoke with CNN, Alec’s mom said she “couldn’t keep it together trying to read those signs, it was so overwhelmingly good for me to see how much my boy was loved.”

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